Trick-or-Treating Tips

Halloween is coming up this week, and we all want to make sure that we are prepared for the adorable trick-or-treaters. Of course, no two children are the same, but you want to make sure that the candy that you are giving them is suitable for most, if not all, children. With that being said, you have to take food allergies into consideration and know what to look for when a child has an allergic reaction to something they’ve eaten. It is good to know what kinds of candies are more versatile or both tasty and allergy-free. There are also two movements that take place this holiday that help ensure an enjoyable Halloween for all parents and trick-or-treaters.

Some of the most common foods that children are allergic to are peanuts and other nuts, gluten, certain fruits like citrus fruits, soy, eggs and dairy. When a child has an allergic reaction to a food that they have eaten, a number of things could occur. They could experience anaphylactic shock, tingling or itching of the mouth, body and/or face swelling, hives, itching or eczema, wheezing or trouble breathing, diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2017). Some parents keep an epinephrine auto injector, or EpiPen, with them at all times in case of a serious allergic reaction, but you also want to see a doctor or allergist if there is a chance that your child has had an allergic reaction. 

In order to avoid a child experiencing any of these dreadful allergy symptoms, it’s best to purchase treats that are allergy-free or having some non-food trinkets that some of the trick-or-treaters can have instead. To help better prepare you, here’s a list of a few non-allergy candies that are also quite tasty (Jackson, 2019):

  • Sour Patch Kids
  • Swedish Fish
  • Skittles
  • Jelly Belly beans
  • Peeps Marshmallow Ghosts
  • Mike and Ike
  • Lifesavers
  • Starburst, and
  • Fruit flavored lollipops or suckers that do not contain corn syrup

Another way to prepare for this holiday is to be aware of two projects that take place during Halloween. During Halloween, the Teal Pumpkin Project and the children with a blue bucket may be seen. “The Teal Pumpkin Project is a campaign initiated by the non-profit organization Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE)” (O’Kane, 2019). A home will have the teal, or aqua hue painted pumpkin on their porch with an informative sign on a treat bucket letting parents and trick-or-treaters know that there are non-food treats and trinkets in that bucket. So parents, feels free to take a non-food treat for your little one. If you see someone with a blue bucket, they are trick-or-treaters that have autism. These blue buckets help raise awareness for children with autism as well as lets the homeowners know that the child may be nonverbal, but they should still treat them just the same as other children. These two movements give both parents and trick-or-treaters a little peace of mind and avoids any potential added stress that could occur (O’Kane, 2019).

I think that Halloween is a holiday that many parents and children look forward to! So you want to ensure that it is as enjoyable as possible by making sure that you are prepared as you can be. So be sure that you are stocked with allergy-free treats or non-food items, and be mindful of any blue buckets or teal pumpkins this holiday. Have a fun and Happy Halloween!

 

References

Jackson, K. (2019, October 1). 7 allergen-free candies to keep on hand for Halloween. Retrieved 

October 23, 2019, from https://www.today.com/shop/best-allergy-free-candy-halloween-

t162776.

Mayo Clinic Staff. (2017, May 2). Food allergy. Retrieved October 23, 2019, from 

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/food-allergy/symptoms-causes/syc-20355095.

O’Kane, C. (2019, October 16). Mom urges use of blue Halloween buckets to raise autism 

awareness. Retrieved October 23, 2019, from https://www.cbsnews.com/news/mom-urges-blue-halloween-buckets-to-raise-autism-awareness/.

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